Signs have been posted through the heart of Billings that will direct some interstate traffic through downtown and cause some travel delays over the next couple of weeks.

According to the information from the Montana Department of Transportation, the closure of the westbound 27th Street off-ramp began on September 27 and could be closed through October 7.

Credit: Johnny Vincent, Townsquare Media

MDT says there may be "short delays" in the area during construction, with traffic down to one lane on Interstate 90 between the 27th Street and Lockwood Interchanges.

Beginning early in October, the Montana Department of Transportation will be closing the Jim Dutcher Trail at the Yellowstone River Bridges. And if weather permits, plans are to close the eastbound 27th Street off-ramp in late October and two-way traffic being moved to the westbound lanes of I-90.

MDT also announced the following width restrictions for loads over 13 feet are currently in effect:

Wide load accommodations and a staging area will be provided, and trucks will be chauffeured through the construction area Monday-Friday, 3:30-5:30 a.m. Freight and wide loads are advised to take an alternate route when possible.

On Monday, an oversize load crept through downtown Billings and narrowly cleared the pedestrian bridge on 1st Avenue North.

Credit: Johnny Vincent, Townsquare Media

The Montana Department of Transportation is asking motorists who are traveling through the work zone to slow down, look for workers, and "put down your phone."

Completion of the Yellowstone River Bridge project is expected in 2024, according to the MDT website.

For updates from the MDT on the Interstate 90 / Yellowstone River Bridge project, you can text i90yellowstone to 1-844-799-0212 or CLICK HERE to get all the information.

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