Disclaimer: This article in no way condones murder or makes light of missing persons in Montana. 

Much of the nation has been intrigued by the story of a body being found in a barrel in Lake Mead, Nevada. The body is believed to have been dumped in the lake in the late 70s or early 80s and unless someone comes forward with info, the murder will probably remain unsolved. Another set of human remains was discovered a few days ago in the same reservoir and authorities expect to find more as the lake created by Hoover Dam continues to recede to record low levels.

Montanans have a saying regarding the Three S's.

"Shoot, shovel, shut up." According to the Montana Department of Justice, 97% of all missing persons in Montana are found, usually within a few days. But one can certainly speculate there are plenty of bodies in the mountains, plains, and backcountry of Montana that have never been found (and probably never will). Especially remnants from our early pioneer days, when vigilante justice was fairly common.

Read More: There Are 53 Active Missing Women Cases in Montana (9/20) |

Photo by Tafadzwa Ufumeli/Getty Images
Photo by Tafadzwa Ufumeli/Getty Images
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Down an abandoned mine shaft.

While various state and federal agencies have gated, filled, or blocked entrances to abandoned mineshafts in Montana, plenty remain. I've been to places in the southwestern corner of the state that look almost exactly like the picture above. Some of the shafts plunge hundreds of feet down, making a body discovery unlikely.

Google Street View
Google Street View
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Somewhere in Petroleum County

Bodies get found by people. Fewer people = less chance of someone stumbling upon the evidence of your murderous deed. In Winnett, MT you'll be in the least populated county in Montana. At last count, less than 500 people live in an area that encompasses over a million acres. Plenty of wide-open spaces to bring your shovel.

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Photo by Janie Osborne/Getty Images
Photo by Janie Osborne/Getty Images
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The Berkeley Pit

I'm sure there are security cameras, motion sensors, and tall fences around the pit, but once you get past those, sinking a body in the toxic water is probably a good spot to hide the evidence. It's not like fishermen, boaters or swimmers will find it.

Google Maps
Google Maps
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Sink it in the deepest lake in Montana.

Okay, perhaps too many eyes are around Berkeley Pit and you don't want to risk getting caught. How about sinking a body in the deepest lake in the state? Tally Lake near Whitefish is allegedly the deepest at 450+ feet (or perhaps second deepest, according to my internet searching).

Photo by Alvaro Calvo/Getty Images
Photo by Alvaro Calvo/Getty Images
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A pig farm.

There have been numerous reports of pigs eating human bodies. In one scenario in Oregon, the only remains found were the poor soul's dentures and a few body fragments. Montana is known for its cattle, but various Hutterite colonies in the Treasure State have large-scale pig farms. Simply sneak in there and toss the body to the hogs.

Photo by Emma Smith on Unsplash
Photo by Emma Smith on Unsplash
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Bob Marshall Wilderness

You'll need to do some serious pre-planning if you want to hide a body here, as it's closed to motorized vehicles, but "the Bob" is one of the most completely preserved mountain ecosystems in the world. Sling that body you need to dump over your horse or pack mule, trek three days into the wilderness and leave it for the grizzly bears to snack on.

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