If you were thinking about hiking up the M and hanging out there on Friday night to get a glimpse of the Guns N' Roses concert at Washington-Grizzly Stadium... well, you better come up with a new plan.

It's not just the M trail either - all of Mount Sentinel will be shut down for 24 hours, beginning at 8 AM on Friday, August 13th. Officially, the reason is because of fire danger and the ongoing Stage II fire restrictions. But I would imagine the added bonus of making people buy tickets if they want to see Slash play the Godfather theme on his guitar doesn't hurt, either.

And hey, if you're looking to go to Guns N' Roses on Friday and don't have your tickets yet, you could always enter to win our VIP "Paradise City" package! Still a couple of days left to get in on this, all you've gotta do is send us a photo of your paradise spot in Missoula through our free app!

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Patrols will be in place ready to remove trespassers if they try to go on any of the closed-off trails. You'll also receive a ticket if you attempt it, too.

Thankfully, it's only for 24 hours, so the next day you'll be able to do all the hiking you want all over Mount Sentinel. But while Axl Rose is in town, you're going to have to have some patience before you're up on the mountain again (see what I did there?).

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