If you've spent time scrolling through Facebook in the past, you've likely seen someone share a post from a group. There are literally thousands of groups on Facebook, but there are some that you might find useful as a resident of Billings. Whether you need to sell something, rant about a customer service experience you've had or find out where the nearest food truck to you is located, here are five Facebook groups you should be a part of if you live here in the Magic City.

What's Happening in Billings

This group is there for the residents to talk about general goings-on around the city. Have you found a wallet on the ground? Post about it here, and maybe you'll be able to find its rightful owner.

Billings Marketplace

Finding things to buy or trying to sell something can be difficult, but not in this group. Their rules also allow discussion of events in the city, much like the What's Happening in Billings group.

Classifieds (Billings, MT)

Another group that allows Billings residents to buy and sell items. Their rules are more extensive though, so read them thoroughly before joining.

Billings Food Truck Tracker

Food trucks have some of the best food I've ever had, and Billings has quite a few of them. Track them all with this Facebook group. If you own a business, you can also request a food truck by posting here too.

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Billings Customer Service Watchdog

Have you had a bad experience with a business here in town, or perhaps you want to praise and highlight a business that did a great job? Post your experiences here. Again, make sure you read and follow their rules.

Links to each of these groups are in their names. Check them out, and perhaps you'll find exactly what you need or want.

h/t: KFMX-FM

Getting to Know Billings From A to Z

New to Billings or not, the Magic City may look like an industrial town from the freeway, but take any exit and you'll discover a city with idiosyncrasies and a whole lot of Montana personality.

LOOK: 50 famous memes and what they mean

With the infinite number of memes scattered across the internet, it's hard to keep track. Just when you've grasped the meaning of one hilarious meme, it has already become old news and replaced by something equally as enigmatic. Online forums like Tumblr, Twitter, 4chan, and Reddit are responsible for a majority of meme infections, and with the constant posting and sharing, finding the source of an original meme is easier said than done. Stacker hunted through internet resources, pop culture publications, and databases like Know Your Meme to find 50 different memes and what they mean. While the almost self-replicating nature of these vague symbols can get exhausting, memes in their essence can also bring people closer together—as long as they have internet access.