The big national news broke earlier this week- three liberal school board members were kicked to the curb by the voters in San Francisco, in overwhelming numbers. One school board member was recalled with nearly 80% of the vote.

It was pretty funny even listening to MSNBC on Thursday morning explaining why the voters rejected these school board members. They were shutting down schools. They were pushing "woke" politics like changing the names of schools. They wanted to remove Abraham Lincoln's name from one school. Even "DiFi" Dianne Feinstein wasn't liberal enough for them. Oh yeah, and in the name of "equity" they discriminated against Asian American kids.

This is interesting here in Montana for a number of reasons. First off, it shows how sick and tired Americans are of these absurd COVID restrictions- especially when it comes to our kids. Second, Democrat appointees on the Board of Public Education and liberal school board members in places like Bozeman are pushing the same nonsensical "equity" proposals that got these school board members in trouble even in the liberal city of San Francisco.

But it's also interesting from a different standpoint. Look at how many Californians have been moving to Montana. As Evelyn Pyburn noted in the Big Sky Business Journal Hotsheet:

Between 2019 and 2020 there was a 20.8% increase in the number of people moving into Billings from California.

She also reported separately that the city of San Francisco has over 40,000 vacant homes. It's so bad in San Francisco that they are looking at taxing people who own vacant homes. The San Francisco Chronicle even recently published a story asking why so many San Fransiscans are moving to Montana.

So think about the school board vote from this standpoint: San Francisco was already liberal, and yet look at how many people already left the city. I imagine a lot of middle of the road and conservative folks had already left San Francisco- it was mostly only still the liberals that are left there. And they still lost- BIG.

 

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